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and cats. could we be entirely wrong when we see that tail wagging. abc's linzie janis on listening to the animals. >> reporter: pets aren't always this easy to read. >> there's a lot of jumping and tail wagging. >> he'll stick out his lower tooth like this. >> reporter: researchers say there may be some, shall we say, misunderstanding between us. scientists in japan used high speed cameras to track doggy facial expressions in different situations and they found similar patterns in how they behaved. they say raised eyebrows, especially the left one means i'd like your attention. they notice the dog's left ear moves back when coming across a stranger expressing fear. >> looking away is definitely a sign that she's a little bit not very happy. >> reporter: in dog speak that means i'm being polite, avoiding confrontation. cats are more complicated. in britain, animal scientists came up with a self-help video for cat owners looking to decode their mysterious ways, like this kitty rolling over, think this means rub my belly, please? not quite. in fact, that would be a violation of trust.
is everything in moderation. linzie janis, abc news, new york. >>> next to a danger in the home we have told you about on "world news." the popular laundry detergent pods that look like candy and can attribute children to eat them. they're being linked to the tragic death of a child. >> reporter: the colorful pods filled with highly concentrated dejer tent look just like candy. you can see that here, the pod on the left, the candy on the right. they're attractive to children. it was a 7-month-old florida boy who died after apparently swallowing one. this is a growing problem. last year poison control centers received 6200 calls involving children and the detergent pods. this year already more than 5700 cases. consumer groups have been calling for changes for over a year. >> what we would really like to see is a coating on the product to keep kids from swallowing, something that makes it taste bitter. >> keep products out of reach of children. >> reporter: proctor and gamble makes tide pods. that was not the brand swallowed by the florida infant. it changed its pod packing from what looked like a
that saved her. here's abc's linzie janis. >> reporter: abbey was going tore her evening jog when she spotted a black bear like this one. >> i was thinking oh, my gosh, this is it. i'm not going to live. >> reporter: the 12-year-old's survival instingts kicked in. >> i was running and all of a sudden the bear got me and put me down on the ground and started scraping me and clawing me and then i got away. >> reporter: but the bear pounced again. that's when abbey had an idea. >> i was like, petting it. i don't know where that came from. i thought maybe if i petted it it would like me. that did not work. >> reporter: so she tried something else. >> i heard that you should play dead so that's what i did. then it kind of went away. then it looked back and then it just took off. >> reporter: rescuers told abbey she was lucky to be alive because playing dead is what they tell people not to do. >> bears eat dead animals so you don't want to play dead. never try to outrun them. they're great swimmers, climbers, runners. >> reporter: abbey says he's not letting it get her down. >> this is a freak thin
general now suing donald trump. here's abc's linzie janis. money money money >> reporter: on "the apprentice," billionaire real estate mogul donald trump offers one lucky contestant the opportunity to learn from him. >> not going to get along with people, you may be successful, but it's going to be a lot harder. >> reporter: but it's not the first time he's offered to teach the secrets of his success. >> we teach success. that's what it's all about. success. >> reporter: tonight, he's being sued by new york's attorney general, who says he was making false promises to thousands of students who took his investment courses. a lawsuit filed late saturday alleges trump operated his school without a license for six years. recruiting 5,000 people through an elaborate bait and switch. >> we're going to have professors that are absolutely terrific. >> reporter: promising them the chance to become rich, only if they spent up to $35,000 on his exclusive classes and mentoring programs. >> they were fleeced. they were taken. they were convinced by very persuasive motivational speakers and by v
real estate classes at his trump university. here's abc's linzie janis with the public showdown. >> reporter: whether you love him or hate him, donald trump's name sells things, but when he put his name on trump university, promising the tricks of the real estate trade -- >> we teach success. that's what it's all about. >> reporter: new york's attorney general says it was a ripoff. >> they fleeced more than 5,000 people out of more than $40 million. >> reporter: the complaint alleges the school promised instructors hand picked by trump that would give secrets to riches but many students were deep in debt. the school shut down in 2011. bob says he spent $35,000 under the impression he would get secrets, tips and a first crack at investing in trump properties. >> he took my self-respect and embarrassed me. >> reporter: in response trump's office forwarded us this survey they say he filled out giving the program an excellent rating. >> if you talk with the investors with madoff before they learned their money was gone, they thought he was the greatest thing that happened to them, s
getting a new set of lungs is home and looking forward to starting her new life. abc's linzie janis on a homecoming. >> reporter: 11-year-old sarah murnaghan is home tonight after two lung transplants and more than six months in the hospital. >> sarah is looking forward to being a regular little kid. >> reporter: about four months ago sarah was dying of late stage cystic fibrosis and the murnaghans sued to get her on the adult transplant list, something she was denied. because of a law that prioritizes children 12 and older. her parents reached out to the media months ago in hopes of highlighting her plight and sparked a national debate over transplant rules. in june, a federal judge ordered a temporary halt to the so called under 12 rule and sarah got her lungs. after her little body rejected the first pair, doctors tried a second transplant three days later. so far they say her prognosis is good. >> how does it feel to be home? >> good. >> reporter: sarah's parents say they'll continue to fight the under 12 rule but some say sarah's case may have set a precedent for allowing medic
heal the sick. here's abc's linzie janis. >> reporter: dr. farid fata is behind bars for the unthinkable, mistrea mistreating patients to bilk medicare out of millions of dollars. he fabricated diagnosis in order to perform expensive tests. relatives of his alleged victims are speaking out. jeff says when his father didn't respond to chemotherapy, the doctor refused to discontinue the drugs. >> they were giving my father transfusions in the parking barrage area. what kind of treatment is that. >> the government had not retained an expert to give an opinion. >> reporter: others suspected something was wrong as far back as 2010. >> things were being administ administered and used incorrectly. >> reporter: cancer nurse angela swantek said she complained. >> to know that a doctor could have potentially brought your death on sooner is sickening. >> reporter: a year later, the licensing board could not prove allegations and closed the file. if convicted, he faces up to 20 years in prison. federal prosecutors are still building their case against him as more patients' relati
not before? abc's linzie janis shows you the best ways to stave off a sting. >> reporter: tonight, a warning from the country's top allergy experts. just because you have been stung by a bee before and been fine, it doesn't mean you're safe from a potentially fatal reaction. 51-year-old carolyn taylor fits the bill. stung twice, no problem. ten years ago, stung again. >> i could feel my face growing. i was so itchy. i called my husband over to look at me. the look on his face was he was terrified. my face was like a big, pink hive. my features were changing. you couldn't see my nose. >> reporter: immunologists warn that aller skris to bee stings are on the rise. 3% of people can have a severe life-threatening reaction. >> the thing that's so interesting about allergies is that you're fine until you're not fine. you could have been exposed before, all of a sudden, you're making anti-bodies. >> reporter: august is prime time for bee stings. visits to emergency rooms spike around labor day. how do you keep from getting stung? avoid sweet-smelling perfumes. if a bee is near, stay calm, walk away
's linzie janis. >> reporter: dr. farid fata is behind bars for the unthinkable, mistrea mistreating patients to bilk medicare out of millions of dollars. he fabricated diagnosis in order to perform expensive tests. relatives of his alleged victims are speaking out. jeff says when his father didn't respond to chemotherapy, the doctor refused to discontinue the drugs. >> they were giving my father transfusions in the parking barrage area. what kind of treatment is that. >> the government had not retained an expert to give an opinion. >> reporter: others suspected something was wrong as far back as 2010. >> things were being administ administered and used incorrectly. >> reporter: cancer nurse angela swantek said she complained. >> to know that a doctor could have potentially brought your death on sooner is sickening. >> reporter: a year later, the licensing board could not prove allegations and closed the file. if convicted, he faces up to 20 years in prison. federal prosecutors are still building their case against him as more patients' relatives come forward. >>> hanging out with gr
and family members accusing the oncologist of forcing chemotherapy on healthy patients. abc's linzie janis has the story. >> reporter: the doctor is behind bars charge with the unthinkable, mistreating cancer patients to bilk medicare for tens of millions of dollars. federal prosecutors argued the 48-year-old oncologist gave unnecessary chemotherapy to patients in remission and fabricated diagnoses to do expensive tests. relatives of alleged victims are speaking out. jeff burr says when his father didn't respond to chemotherapy, the doctor refused to stop administering the drug. >> they were giving my father transfusions in the parking garage area. what kind of a practice is that? >> reporter: his attorney says his client is innocent. >> the government has not retained an expert to give an opinion there was mistreatment, misdiagnosis or unnecessary test given to any patient. >> reporter: others suspected something was wrong back in 2010. >> things were being administered and abused incorrectly. >> reporter: the cancer nurse first complained to investigators after observing employ's at dr.
with their bare hands. linzie janis will be bringing us that story, coming up. >>> and the new batman buffs up. how ben affleck is getting into shape to play the caped crusader in the next movie. >>> we have the story of an extremely brave little girl, who fought off a kidnapper with the only weapon she had, her teeth. >> 8-year-old heather darnell praised for fighting back in a terrifying situation. and tai hernandez is here with her story. >> we have that video, thanks to a surveillance camera. and it shows every parent's nightmare. the suspect's car driving by a young girl's home. and 20 minutes later, an attempted abduction right in her own backyard. >> that man came over here. >> and what did he do, health center. >> he put his hand in my mouth. >> what did you do? >> bite him. >> reporter: 8-year-old heather darnell is still shaken, by the attempted kidnapping, seen here on surveillance video. she was playing in the alleyway with her 6-year-old brother, when the suspect drove by. 20 minutes later, the suspect returns and attempts to get ahold of heather. >> an older, light-skinned black
people suffered injuries varying degrees. abc's linzie janis has the latest on a disturbing trend. >> reporter: 12-year-old abby weatherell has been home from the hospital for just a few hours and bravely talking about the moment she was attacked by a bear as she was jogging home from her grandparents' house. >> i take off running from the direction i came from and it just, it got me. it, it tackled me down. and it clawed me and stuff. and then it kind of -- walked away a little bit, and then, so then i got up and starting run again, and then it came back and got me and then i -- just thought i should play dead and so i heard that you should do that, and then so i was laying there and then it went away. >> reporter: and what was going through her mind? did she think she would survive? >> no, i didn't. i was like, oh, my gosh, i'm going to, this is it. i am going to die. when it came back the second time it kind of stopped. i kind of petted it. and that did not work. so then it just mauled me. i think worse. >> reporter: abby suffered deep gashes and puncture wound to her thighs an
. linzie janis, abc news, new york. >> apparently the inquiry started by the way after a bunch of complaints. new york attorney general eric schneiderman appears on "gma" later this morning and the latest from donald trump. >> hear from his side. see what he has to say. >> i love the tweet. an amused way. a lightweight attorney general. don't think he is going to make the attorney general any nicer by calling him a lightweight. trump he knows how to stand his ground. >> don't know if you can call it that. to say that he's -- an attorney general is trying to extort you. like the money is going into his pocket. restitution of $40 million being sought. and six years. he ran the university, 5,000 students. taken the university name off of it. he wasn't licensed to have that name. wonder what he will call it. trump make you rich. >> one of the things in the lawsuit. about the advertising. trump said he was hand picking instructors for the course. on investing and the lawsuit alleges that he didn't choose any instructors or create any of the curriculum. >> interested to see what it w
surprise. abc's linzie janis has been talking to the animals. >> reporter: pets are always this easy to read. >> there is a lot of jumping, tails wagging. >> he'll stick out, like, his lower tooth like this, huh? >> reporter: researchers say there may be some, shall we say, misunderstandings between us. scientists in japan used high speed cameras to track doggy facial expressions in different situations and found similar patterns in how they behaved. they say raised eyebrows, perilously the left one means, i would like your attention. they notice the dog's left ear moves back when coming across a stranger, which expresses fear. >> kind of looks away. try to look at her. looking away. a sign that she is not very happy. >> reporter: in dog-speak that means i'm being polite. avoiding confrontation. cats are more complicated. in britain animal scientists came up with a self-help video for cat owners looking to decode their mysterious ways. like this kitty rolling over. think this means rub my belly, preez? not quite. that would be a violation of trust. he's telling you, rub my head. and
of those four who didn't survive. three of them children. abc's linzie janis on the scene for us tonight. >> reporter: just seconds after a plane crashes into this home, a neighbor capturing the chaos on his cell phone -- >> oh, my god! >> reporter: people running to the windows, asking if there are children inside. >> is there a kid in there? >> i don't know. >> reporter: their mother on the front lawn screaming. >> she said my two children are in the house. >> i flipped over the crib and looked in the closet, and couldn't find anybody. >> reporter: siblings, ages 1 and 13, are believed to have been in an upstairs bedroom. also killed, pilot bill henningsgaard and his 17-year-old son, max, who were minutes from landing. neighbors say this is a nightmare come true. >> i was always afraid of planes coming in. that it would crash someday. that's what i used to always talk about. >> reporter: last year, there were more than 1400 accidents involving private planes, killing 432 people. the national transportation safety board says small plane crashes have become a huge concern. >> this is an
of giving chemotherapy when it was not necessary. here's abc's linzie janis now. >> reporter: dr. farid fata is behind bars tonight, charged with the unthinkable. mistreating his cancer patients in order to bilk medicare for tens of millions of dollars. federal prosecutors argued the 48-year-old oncologist gave unnecessary chemotherapy to patients in remission. and fabricated diagnose diagnosis in order to perform expensive tests. and tonight, relatives of his alleged victims are speaking out. >> my father -- >> reporter: jeff says that when his father didn't respond to chemotherapy, the doctor refused to stop administering the drugs. >> they were giving my father transfusions in the parking garage area and, you know, what kind of a practice is that? >> reporter: fata's attorney says his client is innocent. >> the government has not retained an expert to give an opinion that there was a mistreatment or misdiagnosis or unnecessary test given to any patient. >> reporter: but others suspected something was wrong as far back as 2010. >> things were being administered and infused incorrectly. >>
from the experts who know these bears. here's abc's linzie janis. >> reporter: four hikers in yellowstone national park, charged by a mother bear, protecting her cub. two of the hikers were mauled, but all escaped alive. just 50 miles away in idaho, another attack. this time two park workers accidentally woke a sleeping grizzly. it attacked. both men are hospitalized tonight. it is bear season. when bears come out to bulk up before hibernation. in yosemite alone, bear encounters are up 64% from last year. but bears are also venturing closer to civilization. this furry thief stole an entire dumpster in colorado for a bear buffet. and here in happen akon, new jersey, police say they get around three calls a week from residents reporting black bears in their yards. georgette machitto had an unwelcome visitor on sunday. >> he was on that hill right there. coming toward me. >> oh, my gosh. you were in your car? >> i was in the car. >> reporter: if you find yourself near a bear, back away slowly. but if the bear keeps coming? >> one of the biggest myths is play dead. because bear
. here's abc's linzie janis. >> reporter: 12-year-old abby wetherell was going for a jog, training for her favorite sport when she came across a bear. >> and she had seen a bear out of the corner of her eye. >> reporter: her grandfather said she started to run faster but the black bear like this one chased her. >> she started running again and he came up behind her again and knocked her down. >> reporter: at one point, abigail tried to play dead but then she did the best thing she could do -- she screamed. >> one of the neighbors heard abby screaming. the neighbor hollered for my son who lives next door and they both went running back into the woods. the bear was already gone. >> reporter: the dedicated soccer player was airlifted to a hospital in northern michigan where she underwent surgery. there's been a spate of bear attacks across the country in recent days. on friday, a camper was attacked in her tent in colorado. on thursday, grizzly attacks, two hikers were mauled in yellowstone national park and in idaho, two park workers were hospitalized. bears are out looking for food
-old girl attacked in michigan, describing the horror for the first time. here's abc's linzie janis again tonight. >> reporter: 12-year-old abby wetherell has been home from the hospital for just a few hours and she's bravely talking about the moment she was attacked by a bear, as she was jogging home from her grandparents' house. >> i take off running from the direction i came from and it just -- it got me and it tackled me down and it clawed me and stuff. and then it kind of walked away a little bit. and then, so, i got up and started running again. and then it came back and got me and then i was -- i just thought, i should play dead. and so, i heard that you should do that. and then, so, i was just laying there and then it went away. >> reporter: and what was going through her mind? did she think she'd survive? >> no, i didn't. i was like, oh, my gosh. i'm going to -- this is it. i'm going to die. when it came back the second time, it kind of stopped, so, i kind of petted it and -- that did not work. so, then it just mauled me, i think worse. >> reporter: abby suffered deep gashes and
. is this the beginning of a comeback? here's abc's linzie janis. >> reporter: she's taken the heat and tonight paula deen is ready to get back in the kitchen, after the hardest few months of her career. >> one tablespoon of butter. >> reporter: fresh details are emerging about the settlement between deen and former employee lisa jackson, who claims she suffered from racial discrimination and sexual harassment. the two sides settling in court, with no money changing hands. and then a bizarre about face, jackson even states her admiration, saying quote, the paula deen i have known for more than eight years is a woman of compassion and kindness. and will never tolerate discrimination or racism of any kind toward anyone. the question now, will it be enough to repair her damaged multimillion dollar reputation? >> you have to live in the court of law. you have to live in the court of public opinion. she's clearly winning in the court of law. but she's already lost in the court of public opinion. and that's the reality she has to live with. >> reporter: in may, deen swore under oath, she once used the n word. >
as a seesaw. in the middle, it has the least movement. >> reporter: linzie janis, abc news, new york. >> some statistics here are mind blowing. >> they really are. >> i've been convinced that i'm going to die on a plane crash. i think everybody is. every time you go in, you feel turbulence. ts it's my time! turns out you are three times more likely to be killed by lightning. twice as likely killed by a bee sting. >> that is an amazing stat. twice as likely to be killed by a bee sting than a plane crash. >> be electrocuted in your own home, eight times more likely. >> 19 times safer in a plane than a car. you never fall 20,000 feet out of a car. >> you've got a really good point. don't have any control. don't see where you are going. the problem. >> you didn't have control. >> you have no control. that's the problem. >>> coming up next, remembering the legacy of dr. martin luther king. >> something you may not have known about dr. king's "i have a dream" speech revealed 50 years after it was delivered. >>> in the next half hour, how kate, the duchess of cambridge, is trying to be a normal, eve
't necessary. here's abc's linzie janis. >> reporter: this doctor is behind bars tonight, charged with the unthinkable. mistreating his cancer patients in order to bilk medicare for tens of millions of dollars. federal prosecutors argued the 48-year-old oncologist gave unnecessary chemical therapy to patients in remission. and fabry kated diagnosis in order to perform expensive tests. and tonight, relatives of his alleged victims are speaking out. >> my father -- >> reporter: jeff says that when his father didn't respond to che chemotherapy, the doctor refused to stop administering the drugs. ? they were giving my father transfusions in the parking garage area and, you know, what kind of a practice is that? >> reporter: the doctor's attorney says his client is innocent. >> the government has not retained an expert to give an opinion that there was a mistreatment or misdiagnosis or no unnecessary test given to any patient. >> reporter: but ores suspected something was wrong as far back as 2010. >> things were being infused incorrectly. >> reporter: cancer nurse angela swantek obser
. linzie janis on the scene for us tonight. >> reporter: just seconds after a plane crashes into this home, a neighbor capturing the chaos on his cell phone -- >> oh, my god! >> reporter: people running to the windows, asking if there are children inside. >> is there a kid in there? >> i don't know. >> reporter: their mother on the front lawn screaming. >> she said my two children are in the house. >> i flipped over the crib and looked in the closet, and couldn't find anybody. >> reporter: siblings are believed to have been in an upstairs bedroom. also killed, pilot bill henningsgaard and his 17-year-old son, max, who were minutes from landing. neighbors say this is a nightmare come true. >> i was always afraid of planes coming in. that it would crash someday. that's what i used to always talk about. >> reporter: last year, there were more than 1400 accidents involving private planes. killing 432 people. the national transportation safety board says small plane crashes have become a huge concern. >> this is an important issue if we are going to drive down the fatality number in general avi
others allegedly unnecessary chemo. this was a scheme to make tens of millions of dollars. linzie janis is on the story. linzie, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, dan. this morning, farid fatah is in jail after being charged with mistreating his patients and defrauding the government of $35 million in false medicare claims. prosecutors want to deny him bail. federal prosecutors are fighting to keep 48-year-old doctor farid fatah behind bars, calling the oncologist a flight risk. tuesday, federal agents arrested him, raiding the offices in the detroit area and seizing medical records. in court documents, a u.s. attorney alleges that fatah gave unnecessary chemotherapy to patients in remission, and fabricated diagnosis in order to bilk medicare for millions. this morning, relatives of his alleged victims are speaking out. in a bond hearing on friday, jeff burrs said when his father didn't respond to chemotherapy, dr. fatah refused to stop administering the drugs. >> from the time my father began to get chemotherapy, his health deteriorated, it was worse and worse all the time. >> r
's linzie janis is on the scene in east haven, connecticut. linzie, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, dan. the people of this small community who sit right along a runway, says this is one of their worst fears come true. rescuers searched through the night, recovering four bodies, including two children who were inside one of the homes crushed by a small plane that came crashing out of the sky. >> children in the house. >> reporter: one of its wings, slicing through an upstairs bedroom, where neighbors say a 1-year-old and 13-year-old may have been. >> we seen it hit. one wing went through one house. the left side of the wing, landed in the bedroom where the two children were. >> reporter: within seconds of the crash, their mother could be heard screaming on the front lawn. >> she's upstairs. she went upstairs. and flipped over the bed. and flipped over a crib. and looked in the closet. couldn't find anybody. >> reporter: neighbors say it's a nightmare come true. >> i was always afraid of the planes. planes coming in. >> reporter: overnight, the pilot's been identified as bill hennin
it turn out? abc's linzie janis has their story. jay and kateri schwandt would have loved a little girl. but they weren't holding out too much hope. >> after the seventh, it became a routine. >> there was no big shock. out pops the baby. and the doctor says, it's a boy. >> reporter: tucker ray is the schwandt's 12th boy. >> i think they go on in this house. i wouldn't want my precious little daughter to experience a lot of that stuff. >> there's a lot of testosterone going around that feminine touch is kind of -- >> lacking. >> yeah. >> reporter: the boys range from 3 days to 21 years old. an entire sports team. >> its normal for us. this is what we've grown up with. and the greatest thing is living with 11 of your best friends. >> reporter: the parents sometimes playing the role of referee. >> anybody grounded right now? >> uh-huh. >> reporter: jay is self-employed, which he says allows him to help out a lot. but they're starting to worry how they're going to afford cars and colleges. >> this year, we have a senior in high school, a justicenior i freshman. when they turn 16, it looks l
of their blockbuster story. linzie janis has the story. >> reporter: it's the clash of the action heroes. sylvester stallone, versus bruce willis. >> it's a party time. >> reporter: the testosterone spilling off the silver screen and into an online brawl. >> happy trails, hans. >> reporter: the rocky star throwing verbal punches after revealing that willis will not be riding shotgun in "expendibles 3." >> the guy that pulls the strings. and everyone else does your dirty work. >> reporter: willis will be replaced by 71-year-old indiana jones star, harrison ford. a decision that apparently pleased sly. in a twitter smackdown, he implies willis is getting what he deserves. second later, he writes, greedy and lazy. >> no one is saying what the exact reason is. stallone made reference to being greedy. bruce willis probably asked for more money. and they weren't willing to give it to him. >> reporter: some believe that stallone's tweet was more like the action of a teenage girl, than a butt-kicking hero. >> i'm not surprised that sylvester stallone has frustrations. imsurprised he went public with it. it
people buzzing. what was it made of? we'll reveal. thanks to linzie janis. >> reporter: the hair, the car, the makeup, it said old hollywood glamour. but the dress, that was all-gaga. this is understated gaga. the singer greeting her fans outside our studio monday, wearing this white-hot ensemble. the look, all part of lady gaga's giant launch of her new single, "applause," after a broken hip kept her from performing for seven months. twitter was on fire. the white dress was the best today, one person wrote. another tweeting, she looked ab fab in her dress and caddie. the designer of that look, 22-year-old mathieu mirano. he's one of the youngest and brightest stars. and he created it from one of the most unlikely materials. >> it's paper. >> reporter: that's right. the dress, the bra, everything down to the gloves. >> she was wearing paper panties. >> reporter: this is what gaga's dress is made out of? >> yes, it is. there was a special strong paper that we really wanted to use. and that works best for the ensemble. you can't rip this paper. which is why we chose it for her because it's
as a seesaw. and the middle has the least movement. >> reporter: for "good morning america," linzie janis, abc news, new york. >> a lot of good ideas there. the rest of the tips on "reader's digest," go to goodmorningamerica.com on yahoo! the latest issue on print and visual newsstands right here. >>> coming up, tyler florence, right there. he's cooking up a storm. [ cheers and applause ] >> we're back. and tyler florence, the food network show, "the great foot truck race." this morning, he's here to show off the signature dishes in a feast fit for the end of summer. i love fried chicken. this season, you've been to california and oregon. next sunday, you're in idaho. what's been the best so far? >> so, it's our fourth season. and we get a chance to really take eight start-ups. eight brand-new food concepts and flush them out. and create these new business models for people. i think that's exciting. the food truck revolution. i'm not saying the food truck race invented it or started it, but we've given it some life. i'm glad to be a part of it. the great food truck race happens and we give peo
right here by an inmate that just happens to be her son. abc's linzie janis is all over this story this morning. good morning to you. >> good morning, dan. derek lasalle on the run for a sixth-straight day. police arrested his mom, after listening to phone calls between the two. and the fresh details might have you wondering why prison staff didn't see this coming. derek astel looks to be having a conversation on the phone. and he had a small time to dive through an actual window. >> it's like watching the three stooges. >> reporter: police say it was his mother, glenda estelle on the phone, giving him the green light, with the words, it's all good. she's behind bars after they listened to recordings of 40 phone calls of estelle to his mom. the two had been hatching the plan. >> anybody that would make 40 phone calls then jump through a window. i mean, it's almost like getting the sheriff involved. hey, i'm going to escape tomorrow. my mom will be outside a couple blocks away. give me a head start. it's almost that silly. >> reporter: the plot allegedly included this man, who polic
and her current husband and abc's linzie janis is trying to track all the various strands of this. >> trying be the operative word there. good morning, guys. you could argue simon cowell is creating more drama in his personal life than he ever has on tv. put himself smack in the middle of what's looking like a nasty divorce and custody battle. paparazzi snaps snow a distracted looking lauren silverman toy shopping with her 7-year-old son in the hamptons this weekend. the new york socialite carrying simon cowell's love child was reportedly taking a break from crisis talks with her husband andrew silverman over custody of their son. according to website tmz her friends saying she's crying foul saying her hubby knew all along that she and cowell were seeing each other. >> since the news broke -- >> reporter: also cowell is reportedly worried the scandal could be a disaster tore his public image. >> nasty, nasty. >> reporter: nicknamed mr. nasty for his ruthless judgment on "the x factor" -- >> never ever ever again. it's a resounding no. >> reporter: cowell is allegedly worried even
couldn't have done it. linzie janis is here with the story. >> good morning. she says she deserves compensation. her reputation hasn't recovered. this morning, the tennis referee accused of beating her husband to death with a coffee mug last august is heading back to court, only this time it's the los angeles police department playing defense. she was accused of murdering her 80-year-old husband, suing the lapd for false arrest and malicious prosecution. she passed a lie detecter test, and her dna was not on the alleged murder weapon. she said he died from an accidental fall. >> rather than being able to grieve, the lapd hounded her and harassed her and arrested her. >> in a suit on wednesday, goodman's lawyers say they subjected the 76-year-old to extensive publex tens ive humiliation. they said she was having an air fair, they knew that wasn't true. and a public arrest, she was walked out in handcuffs dressed in her uniform, which caused damage to her career and reputation. >> we're suing for justice. what they did to her was beyond the pail. >> she spoke about it in december. >>
for hibernation. linzie janis has this story. >> reporter: this morning an alaska hunter was brutally mauled by a brown bear. it all happened nearly 300 miles from civilization. it was an elaborate in an area so remote they needed to refuel the helicopter in midair just to get to him, more than 36 hours after the attack. it's at least the fifth bear attack in the u.s. in just three days. in michigan, 12-year-old abigail was going for a jog wednesday night when she too came face-to-face with a bear. >> she saw the bear out of the corner of her eye, started running and he came up behind and knocked her down. >> reporter: in mere moments -- >> two large gashes, she was bleeding. >> reporter: the hunt is on with officials scattering traps. >> they will aggressively take care of this problem so this bear does not do it again. >> reporter: and in yellowstone national park, four hikers charged by a mother bear protecting her cubs. even yosemite is seeing a sharp includes in bear encounters, up 64%. it's all happening because we're approaching hibernation season, and they are trying to bulk up, look
was a student there. and once again, a hero who works at the school brought him down. abc's linzie janis is here with more. this could have been really ugly. >> reporter: indeed. good morning, bianna. police tell us that shooter is behind bars this morning. his victim is recovering from injuries. >> we're hot. we're hearing that one's hit. >> reporter: these recordings of police radios capture the chaos, as shots rang out in a crowd of hundreds of students at carver high school in north carolina. >> i took off. he shot twice. >> reporter: they were taking part in a planned fire drill on friday. >> i'm going inside the school. i need officers to go inside the school. >> reporter: within minutes, the school's resource officer, tim wilson, sprang into action. >> he did an excellent job reacting to this situation. >> reporter: police tell abc news, the alleged shooter is a student at the school. identified at 18-year-old christopher lamont richardson. according to the arrest report, he surrendered to the officer without incident. authorities aren't identifying the 15-year-old victim, also a student.
. this was a scheme to make tens of millions of dollars. linzie janis is on the story. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. this morning fared is in jail. he's been charged of mistreating them and defrauding the government of $35 million in false medicare claims. prosecutors want to deny him bail. federal prosecutors are fighting to keep 48-year-old doctor fareed behind bars, calling the oncologist accused of misdiagnosing his cancer patients a flight risk. tuesday, federal agents arrested him, raiding the offices in the detroit area and seizing medical records. a u.s. attorney said he gave unnecessary chemotherapy to patients in remission, and fabricated diagnosis in order to bilk millions from medicare. this morning, relatives of his alleged victims are speaking out. in a bond hearing on friday, jeff burrs said when his father didn't respond to chemotherapy, the doctor refused to stop administering the drugs. >> from the time he got the chemotherapy, his health deteriorated, it was worse and worse all the time. >> his attorney says he is innocent and federal agents have been duped by disgruntled
the case against him as mr. patients' relatives come forward. linzie janis, abc news, new york. >> a mystery, for half a millennium. >> technology may be the key to unlocking the secret to who this woman was that inspired davinci back in the 16th century. >> ahead in the next half-hour. the new technology that is tagging suspected criminals and stolen properties making it a lot easier to find. you are watching "world news now." ♪ ♪ >> 500-year-old mystery surrounding one of the most famous paintings may be getting close to being solved. >> the identity of the model for davinci's masterpiece could be revealed through dna testing. more from london. >> she appears larger. >> reporter: the clue to unlocking one of art's biggest secrets is so ground breaking you might expect to find tom hanks on the scene. instead, it is a real-life team of researchers on the edge of finally answering just who is wt man with the cryptic smile in davinci's masterpiece, the mona lisa. historians and art lovers have kidded possibilities, a lover, a muse, or davinci dressed as a woman. italians have
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